Developer's Blog


So It Begins!

Posted on May 10th, 2017 by Peter Robinson

It has been over a year since my last blog post, and admittedly, I could have sailed around the world in that time. However, I was busy trying to accomplish something much more difficult: completing Pirate Code! At this moment, it remains unfinished and unpublished, but I’ve decided to break radio silence and start the process of showing some of the awesome features that have made their way into Pirate Code. Here we go!

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Pirate Swag!

Posted on March 12th, 2016 by Peter Robinson

To prepare for Steam, Pirate Code has been undergoing a wave of changes! At the heart of these changes is the inventory. When first released Pirate Code had no visible inventory. The game actually did keep track of the items that you collected during missions, but you couldn’t buy or sell items. More importantly, you couldn’t actually use any items. All that has changed in the last few months! Let’s take a look at the Pirate Code inventory system.

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Gold and Bombs

Posted on October 28th, 2015 by Peter Robinson

In my last blog post I mentioned that Pirate Code is coming to Steam. That was months ago. Since then we’ve been hard at work moving Pirate Code to the latest technology. To get ready for Steam we’re also making a number of important changes based on feedback that we’ve received since Pirate Code was originally launched in 2013. But this month I need to backpedal and talk about the changes that went into our last release.

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Balancing Challenge and Reward

Posted on May 31st, 2015 by Peter Robinson

Once a game reaches a certain level of complexity with the main game mechanic, the focus of the game designer shifts from designing the main game to creating a balance between challenge and reward. That’s where we’re at right now with our game, Pirate Code.

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3 Gates to Indie Game Success

Posted on April 30th, 2015 by Peter Robinson

I’ve struggled with how much time I should dedicate to marketing versus actual game development. The problem is always time. Even with large teams, there just isn’t enough time to do everything. So to help myself, I broke down the process of selling a game into three tests that a game must pass in order to sell. If you’re an indie game developer, I hope you’ll find them useful as well.

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6 Reasons to Use Source Control for Your Game

Posted on March 30th, 2015 by Peter Robinson

Indie game developers are not always the most organized people. Many start as hobbyists and become more serious as time wears on. If that’s the boat you’re in, then you probably didn’t think about source control when you started writing your game. You might not even know what it is! Here’s a handful of reasons to check it out.

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5 Tricks to Help You Finish Your Indie Game

Posted on March 1st, 2015 by Peter Robinson

Building an entire game can be a daunting task for a small group of developers. You don’t have to work on your game for very long before you realize that you’re in over your head. Most indie developers quit at this point – typically to pursue a new game idea. Stubborn developers press on…

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The Threat of Reward

Posted on January 31st, 2015 by Peter Robinson

Last year I talked about what motivates people to play games. This month I hope to follow that up with what we’re all really looking for: a reward. At the end of the day we play games that reward us. Whether that comes in the form of a plot twist or a new weapon, rewards drive us to jump through hoops – even if it’s the same hoop, over and over.

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New Year Ho!

Posted on December 31st, 2014 by Peter Robinson

It’s time for us to close another year and welcome in a new one! As we charge into 2015 it’s a good idea to stop and look back at what happened in 2014. Our flagship title, Pirate Code has changed a lot over the last year. Let’s take a look!

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Time: The Indie Developer’s Most Valuable Resource

Posted on November 19th, 2014 by Peter Robinson

Most large corporations say that their most valuable resource is the human resource. If you’re an indie game developer, this corporate mumbo-jumbo probably doesn’t apply to you. And that’s not because people aren’t valuable, but because you don’t have any.

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